Despite the fact that the mainstream media moved on to the next story after Hurricane Katrina, daily life continues to be a struggle for the hurricane survivors. 

Three years later, survivors are scattered over the United States, often unable to return home. Public housing in New Orleans, which had been home for thousands of families before the storm, was demolished in the first few months of 2008. The land remains unused and barren. Trailer parks, where many survivors were relocated after the storm, were closed down, leaving people scrambling to find a place to live. Even with rent vouchers, many are unable to afford the present rises in rent. 

The displaced are living in all 50 states, many live in temporary housing projects without furniture.

As the executive director for Housing and Development in New Orleans once stated: “New Orleans can not take back its poor mainly black population. We strive to have a mixed population, anyone with an education and money is welcome.”

For the past two years Kadir van Lohuizen followed two families in Houston, the Herring family and the Halley family, trying to pick up their lives and track down lost family members scattered all over the country.

This story is part of the Hurricane Katrina project.

Katrina, new orleans
Katrina diaspora in Houston
Katrina diaspora in Houston
Katrina diaspora in Houston
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Katrina diaspora in Houston
Katrina diaspora in Houston
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Katrina diaspora in Houston
Katrina diaspora in Houston
katrina diaspora 2008
katrina diaspora
katrina diaspora 2008
katrina diaspora 2008