“The only risk is that you’ll want to stay.” That’s the slogan the Colombian government uses in seeking to attract foreign tourists. But for an estimated three million Colombians, the situation couldn’t be more different. Violence between guerrilla groups, the army, paramilitaries and drug cartels have forced them into flight. Driven from their villages and farms, they end up in the slums surrounding big cities throughout Colombia. Some of them, like Consuelo Hernández and her family, even flee across the borders.

 

(For their safety, the names and locations in this report have been changed at the subjects’ request .)

 

This story is part of Via Panam, Kadir van Lohuizen’s project about migration in the Americas.

Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Ecuador