El Salvador has been called the most Americanized country in Latin America. It has been estimated that a third of its citizens live in the U.S. – often illegally. A significant part of El Salvador’s national income is made up of the money which these emigrants send back, and American culture has penetrated this small Central American country.

 

Hamburger chains and evangelical churches are signs of this new Americanized way of life. More problematically, many of the Salvadorans deported from the U.S. are criminals or gang members who subsequently continue their activities in their home country.

 

This story is part of Via Panam, Kadir van Lohuizen’s project about migration in the Americas.

 

Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador
Via Panam, migration in the America's, El Salvador