At nine, Lokamu Lopulmoe, a Turkana girl living in rural Kenya, already knows that her parents will marry her off for a dowry, to a man who may beat her. Sunny Bhope, a boy in India already knows he’ll be pressured by his peers to sexually harass women in the street. By age nine, Avery Jackson spent four years of her life living miserably as a boy, and now lives as an openly transgender girl.
Nine-year olds are in the middle of childhood but old enough to have sage views on gender, and how it affects their potential and limitations. They are aware of how life would be different if they took on another gender, how it can influence their future careers and the benefits of being either a boy or a girl.

Photographer Robin Hammond visited 80 homes over four continents to talk to a diverse cast of nine-year olds, posing questions about gender and their expectations of the future.

“Nine-year-olds can be impressively articulate and wise,” says Theresa Betancourt, associate professor of child health and human rights at Harvard University. They face increased peer pressure and responsibility, she says, but not the conformity and self-censorship that come with adolescence.
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives
HAR2016006C | Nine Lives