In many cases immigration means a definitive break within a family. Even if the distance is not so great, as is the case for many Nicaraguans in Costa Rica, a visit to the family members who stayed behind is expensive and time-consuming.

 

Eighteen years ago Conney Hernández Lacayo left her home in Granada, Nicaragua. She now lives with her family in San José, the Costa Rican capital. Most of her children and grandchildren know their family on the other side of the border only from photos.

 

This story is part of Via Panam, Kadir van Lohuizen’s project about migration in the Americas.

Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Costa Rica
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua
Via Panam, migration in the America's, Nicaragua