Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen (The Netherlands) has covered conflicts in Africa and elsewhere, but is probably best known for his long-term projects on the seven rivers of the world, the rising of sea levels, the diamond industry and migration in the Americas.

He started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada. In the years following, he worked in many conflict areas in Africa, such as Angola, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, Liberia and the DR of Congo. From 1990 to 1994 he covered the transition in South Africa from apartheid to democracy.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Kadir covered social issues in different corners of the former empire. In 1997 he embarked on a big project to travel along the seven rivers of the world, from source to mouth, covering daily life along these lifelines. The project resulted in the book “Rivers” and “Aderen” (Mets & Schilt).

Kadir has received numerous prizes and awards in photojournalism. In 2000 and 2002 Kadir was a jury member of the World Press Photo contest and is currently on the supervisory board of the World Press Photo foundation.

In 2004 he went back to Angola, Sierra Leone and the DR of Congo to portray the diamond industry, following the diamonds from the mines to the consumer markets in the western world. The exhibitions that resulted from this project were not only shown in Europe and the USA, but also in the mining areas of Congo, Angola and Sierra Leone. The photo book “Diamond Matters, the diamond industry” was published by Mets & Schilt (Holland), Dewi Lewis (UK) and Umbrage editions (USA) and awarded the prestigious Dutch Dick Scherpenzeel Prize for best reporting on the developing world. The project was also recognized with a World Press Photo Award.

In that same year, Kadir initiated a photo project together with Stanley Greene and six other photographers on the issue of violence against women around the world.

After hurricane Katrina destroyed New Orleans, he made several trips to the USA to document the aftermath of the storm. In the summer of 2010, to mark the fifth commemoration of Hurricane Katrina, Kadir exhibited images of Katrina’s devastation and the aftermath in a truck-exhibition that drove from Houston to New Orleans, a project in collaboration with Stanley Greene.

From 2011 to 2012, Kadir created Via PanAm; a visual investigation on migration in the Americas. In 12-months, he travelled along the Pan American Highway from Terra del Fuego in Patagonia to Deadhorse in Northern Alaska. Originally made as an interactive application for the iPad, Via PanAm was also made into a traveling interactive multimedia based exhibition, installation and a book.

With the project Where will we go, Kadir looked at the global consequences of rising sea levels caused by climate change. The project is designed to highlight both the immense complexities associated with in-island and inter-island/country movement, and the human rights implications involved in such displacements.

Kadir is a frequent lecturer and photography teacher and is based in Amsterdam.

contact

www.viapanam.org

 

+ 31.20.60.60.780 (office)

+31(0)6.2425.3814 (mobile)

 

office@noorimages.com

kadir@noorimages.com

 

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the cold end of the world

Kadir van Lohuizen - March 2012

Deadhorse lies on what its residents call `The Slope`, the coastal plain along the…

strangers in their own land

Kadir van Lohuizen - February 2012

Canada is known for being relatively hospitable to migrants and minorities. The laws protecting…

work force from the south

Kadir van Lohuizen - February 2012

Most Mexican migrants to the United States settle in the border states, such as…

reluctant guest, el cajon

Kadir van Lohuizen - January 2012

“Little Baghdad” is the nickname for El Cajon, a suburb of San Diego. A…

the wall

Kadir van Lohuizen - December 2011

For the thousands of migrants who are trying to reach the US the last…

the trail of the migrants

Kadir van Lohuizen - November 2011

Guatemala - Mexico The Suchiate, the river which forms the border between Guatemala and Mexico,…

money, god and criminals

Kadir van Lohuizen - November 2011

El Salvador has been called the most Americanized country in Latin America. It has…

no country to go back to

Kadir van Lohuizen - October 2011

More than 200,000 of the six million people living in Honduras have roots in…

portrait of a family divided

Kadir van Lohuizen - September 2011

In many cases immigration means a definitive break within a family. Even if the…

pensionados, sitting pretty in a poor country

Kadir van Lohuizen - September 2011

Central America is a favorite destination for moderately wealthy retired North Americans who want…

a new start next door

Kadir van Lohuizen - September 2011

As a prosperous country, Costa Rica is a popular destination for migrants. Nicaraguans in…

the quiet force

Kadir van Lohuizen - August 2011

Panama is home to the largest colony of Chinese in Central America. The first…